Real Estate

Real estate taxes include your home, land, farmland, and commercial property.  The property description on your tax bill describes what is being taxed using a brief tax inventory description.  This should not be used as a legal description.  Many taxpayers receive more than one real estate tax statement.  This is due to the rules the assessor must follow for keeping an inventory of all the land in the county.  Please check your property description on your statement.

When a tract of land is sold, a deed or document must be filed with the recorder’s office.  These transfers are given to the assessor’s office so they can make the changes on their files, which ultimately generate the tax bills.  Please check your statement if you bought or sold property this year.  Transfers made this year may not be reflected.



“I recently purchased property.  Do I owe the entire tax bill?”
Yes.  Real estate taxes are a lien on the property and the land owner is ultimately responsible.  At the time of closing you usually receive a credit for the seller’s portion of the taxes.  We normally do not receive payment at the time of closing.  Questions regarding the taxes would be best answered by the agent who handled your closing.


“My mortgage company escrows my taxes.  Will I receive a bill?”
No.  The mortgage companies send requests for tax bills each year, and we forward the bills to them for payment.  Please forward the bill to your mortgage company if you receive a statement for property you have an escrow for.  We attempt to fulfill mortgage company requests as best we can.  However, when they do not provide us with the appropriate information, we will send the bill to you instead.

“Why are my taxes higher this year?”
Voter approved levy increases (such as new fire districts or school bond issues) will affect the tax rate, therefore your tax amount.  In April 2016, voters approved an increase for the Montgomery County ambulance district. New construction (shed, garage, home addition, etc.…) can also increase the value of your property, resulting in higher taxes.


“I did not receive my tax bill, why should I pay late fees?”
According to state law, failure to receive a bill does not relieve the taxpayer of his/her obligation to pay the taxes when due.  Tax statements are mailed by mid-November to the last known address on the assessor’s books.  It is important to notify the assessor if you move, as forwarding orders with the post office expire.  Please contact us if you have not received a bill by December 1st.